On April 20th, I have the honor of representing my organization in an open panel discussion with esteemed colleagues from some of the largest global brands. The topic of conversation won’t be centered on the monetization of big data, managing asset efficiency or any of the other “sexy” topics of the month. You may find it surprising to know that our time and attention will be focused on one of the most important (but least mastered) subjects facing any enterprise responsible for designing, building, or delivering a finished product. The topic will be: Safety Initiatives that Reduce Preventable Accidents and Impact the Bottom Line.

You might ask why a consulting organization with expertise in business intelligence, strategy, and technology would spend time, energy and effort collaborating in a discussion that doesn’t appear to be in their “sweet spot”? I would, in turn, argue that it should be the primary concern of every American (if not global) organization to protect the health and wellness of its employees. I view the right to leave work in the same state of wellness that you came as a divine right. In that sense, it is the responsibility of organizations and their respective citizens to protect this right and ensure its demonstration in day-to-day activity. Corporate leaders, innovators, problem solvers and strategists all have an obligation to join the discussion with the goal of better protecting our workforce from on-the-job hazards.

While certainly a right, safety doesn’t automatically occur in and of itself. Nor do safe work environments create themselves out of the good will and intentions of corporate citizens. Like other organizational objectives, safety must be measured, managed and paid for through time, planning and resources. I hope to lend the knowledge and experience that our organization has gained in closing performance gaps via technology, strategy, and data-driven insights to the discussion as it pertains to safety. While I would never claim to be the expert on the latest safety regulations, laws or best practices, I have been around long enough to know that safety issues stem from a lack of information at the front line level. In my world, information is data and with such, safety-related data can lead to safety performance enhancement that may go unnoticed at first glance. That enhancement could ensure the safe return of a fellow working citizen to their family after a hard day’s work. This makes it certainly worth the effort to see where synergies may lie, and how we can help to further ensure this right.

Jamal Starr
President/CEO
Starr & Associates Management Consulting

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

clear formPost comment